Cheddar Gorge

This

About rpg

Scientist, poet, gadfly
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110 Responses to Cheddar Gorge

  1. Henry Gee says:

    Erumpent.

  2. Bob O'Hara says:

    mauve

  3. Henry Gee says:

    thrum

  4. Brian Clegg says:

    echoed

  5. Richard P. Grant says:

    resonantly

  6. Bob O'Hara says:

    through

  7. Brian Clegg says:

    the
    (secretly wonders if this a cunning plot on Bob’s part to get to the top of the blog ratings by getting hundreds of comments)

  8. Henry Gee says:

    anechoic

  9. Chris Surridge says:

    Challenge:
    “Through the anechoic” was the original working title for David Frost’s “Through the Keyhole”.

  10. Henry Gee says:

    Is that a proper turn, Chris, or are you just making a smart-alec comment?

  11. Bob O'Hara says:

    Well, whatever, Chris is wrong – it was “Through the archaic”, which was considered modern back then.
    I think this means Chris is in knip, but I can’t be bothered to work out who’s turn is it, so, anyone?

  12. Chris Surridge says:

    Can’t be in knip unless we are using Lipman’s rules, so:
    Baclava

  13. Henry Gee says:

    I don’t think it’s my turn.

  14. Bob O'Hara says:

    OK, I guess I’ll have to continue:
    which

  15. Graham Steel says:

    means

  16. Bob O'Hara says:

    that

  17. Henry Gee says:

    whenever

  18. Chris Surridge says:

    the

  19. Bob O'Hara says:

    occidental

  20. Graham Steel says:

    climates

  21. Brian Clegg says:

    exceed

  22. Cath Ennis says:

    their

  23. Bob O'Hara says:

    southernmost

  24. Brian Clegg says:

    yet

  25. Henry Gee says:

    polydactyllabicatiously

  26. Maxine Clarke says:

    zephyr-like

  27. Cath Ennis says:

    yet

  28. Henry Gee says:

    thinks: we’ve missed a comma, somewhere]

  29. Jon Moulton says:

    Here you go: ,

  30. Cath Ennis says:

    Henry, it’s your fault for confusing us with these complicated long words. I vote that you miss the next two turns.

  31. Henry Gee says:

    It’s an adverb. Get over it. To have followed it with a genitive pronoun was just weird.

  32. Cath Ennis says:

    Yeah, Graham.

  33. Bob O'Hara says:

    Oh dear, I should have known this would happen with you lot. So let’s ignore the comma (most of us don’t care anyway) and continue with
    calm

  34. Brian Clegg says:

    in

  35. Maxine Clarke says:

    Yep, the comma is open to debate so did not put one in in the interests of “moving things along” (mistakenly, inevitably). In fact I thought the hyphen might cause a bit of a stir (wrongly, again). Lynn Truss is worth reading on proofreaders and the comma (in Eats, Shoots, and Leaves) – and they are the professionals and can’t agree.
    but

  36. Maxine Clarke says:

    AArgh – Brian’s “in” arrived while my “but” was in the works. Nonsensical result! What happens now?

  37. Brian Clegg says:

    a

  38. Maxine Clarke says:

    thankful

  39. Henry Gee says:

    missive

  40. Chris Surridge says:

    may

  41. Bob O'Hara says:

    possibly

  42. Maxine Clarke says:

    guess

  43. Chris Surridge says:

    wherefore

  44. Henry Gee says:

    parenthetically
    [it was either that or ‘biscuits’]

  45. Bob O'Hara says:

    appropriated

  46. Chris Surridge says:

    from

  47. Cath Ennis says:

    German

  48. Maxine Clarke says:

    or

  49. Brian Clegg says:

    possibly

  50. Bob O'Hara says:

    Quenya

  51. Chris Surridge says:

    speleologists

  52. Bob O'Hara says:

    have

  53. Graham Steel says:

    heard

  54. Henry Gee says:

    that

  55. Cath Ennis says:

    abandoning

  56. Chris Surridge says:

    any

  57. Brian Derby says:

    previous

  58. Bob O'Hara says:

    newsworthy

  59. Henry Gee says:

    or

  60. Brian Derby says:

    even

  61. Chris Surridge says:

    moderately

  62. Bob O'Hara says:

    interesting

  63. Graham Steel says:

    type

  64. Henry Gee says:

    specimens

  65. Cath Ennis says:

    for

  66. Bob O'Hara says:

    subterranean

  67. Brian Derby says:

    sightless

  68. Chris Surridge says:

    armadillos

  69. Henry Gee says:

    riding

  70. Chris Surridge says:

    and
    (which makes this the most commented upon blog post)

  71. Graham Steel says:

    (no Chris, Jenny holds two Century records – can we break the 100 barrier here?)

  72. Bob O'Hara says:

    holding
    (the century is up to you folks, but this is already my highest score. And probably going to remain that way)

  73. Chris Surridge says:

    out

  74. Graham Steel says:

    (Indeed, your biggest innings to date was 32
    That said, is it not the case that 67.3% of statistics are made up?)

  75. Henry Gee says:

    against

  76. Cath Ennis says:

    subversive

  77. Bob O'Hara says:

    the

  78. Chris Surridge says:

    egregious
    [I’m assuming there was a comma after Cath’s subversive]

  79. Niranjana Nagarajan says:

    omnipresent

  80. Bob O'Hara says:

    and
    (yes. Our posts had crossed)

  81. Cath Ennis says:

    sandy

  82. Bob O'Hara says:

    maned

  83. Graham Steel says:

    Beast like

  84. Maxine Clarke says:

    There should be a hyphen in beast-like, Graham.
    also possibly between Cath’s sandy and Bob’s maned.
    if

  85. Graham Steel says:

    (_Mozzarella-Mountains_ !! I’ve been thrown me off course. Steel moves back 2 squares)

  86. Chris Surridge says:

    moistly

  87. Jennifer Rohn says:

    representative

  88. Brian Derby says:

    of

  89. Cath Ennis says:

    seemingly
    (does anyone else think that the written version of this game is easier than the spoken version?)

  90. Brian Derby says:

    mammalian

  91. Graham Steel says:

    and/or

  92. Brian Derby says:

    furry

  93. Bob O'Hara says:

    monsters

  94. Brian Derby says:

    that

  95. Richard P. Grant says:

    died.

  96. Henry Gee says:

    before

  97. Chris Surridge says:

    anyone
    (hate to mention this but do I see a period/full stop after Richard’s “died”?)

  98. Bob O'Hara says:

    managed
    (Chis – your screen must need cleaning)

  99. Brian Derby says:

    ninety nine
    (almost there)

  100. Bob O'Hara says:

    centuries
    (ta-daa! And we can all raises our collective bat to acknowledge the crowd’s applause)

  101. Henry Gee says:

    *PAAARP!*

  102. Richard P. Grant says:

    I do feel that was a bit of a cheat.

  103. Brian Derby says:

    There was no cheating as Samantha has clearly scored.

  104. Maxine Clarke says:

    Just logged in after a hard day at work (yes, it is now 2150 according to my clock, despite what the N Network clock says) and see from the NN home page that you are enshrined, Bob. Well done!
    Richard’s late googly may have clean bowled the game, but it could not stop the following extras that tipped you into the pantheon of JJB (Jenny, Jenny Bob).
    Now can we stop playing games and get back to Serious Science?

  105. Duncan Hull says:

    To continue the I’m sorry I haven’t a clue theme, does anyone fancy a game of Scientist-themed book and film club ?

  106. Richard P. Grant says:

    Now can we stop playing games and get back to Serious Science?
    Yes mum.

  107. Brian Derby says:

    Duncan
    The ISIHAC theme would be arrivals to the Scientists’ Ball
    “A warm welcome for our Irish visitors Mr. and Mrs. O’Lution and their daughter Eve”

  108. Chris Surridge says:

    get back to Serious Science
    Never! If science has to be relentlessly serious (or worse capitalised) I’m not playing.

  109. Maxine Clarke says:

    Does one have to write a ;-) sign to denote irony? That’s what the caps were for – maybe too subtle. Sorry, Richard and Chris, if it wasn’t clear enough that I wasn’t being entirely serious.

  110. Maxine Clarke says:

    Or even a little bit serious.