Being an expert in (membrane) recycling has perks!

This morning I awoke to the following email (and yes, “OMICS” does it again):

Dear Dr. Steve Caplan,

Greetings of the day. Hope you are doing well.

The purpose of this letter is to invite you to be an eminent speaker at  the World Congress and Expo on Recycling during July 20-22, 2015 at Barcelona, Spain.  The main theme of the conference is “Reduce, Reuse, Recycle for a better tomorrow” which covers a broad array of vitally key sessions.

We came across your contribution entitled  Novel Functions for the Endocytic Regulatory Proteins MICAL-L1 and EHD1 in Mitosis published in the Traffic and thought your expertise would be an excellent fit for Recycling Expo-2015 Conference.

For more details please visit: http://recycling.omicsgroup.com/

We welcome you to be a part of this exciting Recycling Expo-2015 Conference as a Speaker (Oral & Poster)

Kindly contact us for any sort of further assistance.

Have a Great Day Doctor!!

With Regards,
David Culver
Recycling Expo-2015
Environmental  Conferences
5716 Corsa Ave, Suite110
Westlake, Los Angeles
CA-91362-7354, USA
Tel: +1-888-843-8169
Mail : recyclingexpo@omicsgroup.com

I have to admit, this is a new level of sophistication: to “come across” my paper on endocytic regulatory proteins and mitosis, and connect this with environmental recycling. Painstaking research on the part of the organizing committee.

While it sure would be nice to be invited (as an eminent speaker) to Barcelona, I fear that the eminent environmental recycling speakers might be bored to tears hearing about endocytic recycling. So alas, I must decline my emminency…

 

About Steve Caplan

I am a Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the University of Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha, Nebraska where I mentor a group of about 10 students, postdoctoral fellows and researchers working on endocytic protein trafficking. My first lablit novel, "Matter Over Mind," is about a biomedical researcher seeking tenure and struggling to overcome the consequences of growing up with a parent suffering from bipolar disorder. Lablit novel #2, "Welcome Home, Sir," published by Anaphora Literary Press, deals with a hypochondriac principal investigator whose service in the army and post-traumatic stress disorder actually prepare him well for academic, but not personal success. Novel #3, "A Degree of Betrayal," is an academic murder mystery that is now in press! All views expressed are my own, of course--after all, I hate advertising. http://www.stevecaplan.net
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