Author Archives: Henry Gee

About Henry Gee

Henry Gee is an author, editor and recovering palaeontologist, who lives in Cromer, Norfolk, England, with his family and numerous pets, inasmuch as which the contents of this blog and any comments therein do not reflect the opinions of anyone but myself, as they don't know where they've been.

Apotheosis

You’ll both be aware by now that my recent tome was shortlisted for the Royal Society Insight Investment Science Book Prize for 2022. You’ll recall that my book kept some mighty company, so imagine my surprise and delight when, at … Continue reading Continue reading

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What I Read In November

Frans de Waal: Different A salutary and timely corrective to all those engaged in debates about sex and gender that nothing makes sense except in the light of evolution. Humans are animals, and so are our various itches and scratches. The … Continue reading Continue reading

Posted in climate change denial, crusades, edward gibbon, frans de waal, gender, gender studies, gerontology, monty python world's funniest joke, Peter Stott, Richard Osman, rose Anne Kenny, royal society science book prize, sex, The Thursday Murder Club, Writing & Reading | Leave a comment

Incompletion

I regret to say that today I have had to do something I almost never do, mostly because I really hate doing it – and that’s abandon a book I had been reading. And I had got almost all the … Continue reading Continue reading

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In The Air Tonight

 The dream of any author is having their books on sale in the duty-free shops at major airports, alongside the generic thrillers and self-help manuals. Imagine my pleasure therefore at receiving this snap taken by Professor F___ W___, who spotted … Continue reading Continue reading

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What I Read In October

Shon Faye: The Transgender Issue I was alerted to this by Stephen: it was something of an eye-opener. From the amount of newsprint and airtime devote to trans people, you’d think they were engaged in a full-scale invasion. Shon Faye shows … Continue reading Continue reading

Posted in anjana ahuja, edward gibbon, forever free, forever peace, Jeremy farrar, Joe Haldeman, nick davidson, Shon Faye, spike, the Cuvier Geoffroy debate, the decline and fall of the roman empire, the forever war, the greywacke, the transgender issue, toby appel, Writing & Reading | Comments Off on What I Read In October

Camp Catastrophic

Back in the early days of the present unpleasantness I was engaged to take part in a literary festival in Hay-on-Wye (no, not that one, a different one). Cognisant that Offspring2 is a keen bibliophile, I thought I could take … Continue reading Continue reading

Posted in Apparitions, automobile association, camper van, Hay-on-Wye, How The Light Gets In, travel | Comments Off on Camp Catastrophic

The Rings of Power: Impressions of the First Series

You’ll both be aware that I offered a few impressions of the first two episodes of The Rings of Power, the multi-squillion-dollar televisual emission from Amazon Prime. Now that all eight episodes of the first series (or ‘season’, as we … Continue reading Continue reading

Posted in amazon prime, durin, elrond, galadriel, gandalf, gil-galad, halbrand, john garth, Monty Python's Life of Brian, sauroin, Science-fiction, the lord of the rings, the rings of power, the science of middle earth, tolkien | Comments Off on The Rings of Power: Impressions of the First Series

The Rings of Power: Impressions of the First Series

You’ll both be aware that I offered a few impressions of the first two episodes of The Rings of Power, the multi-squillion-dollar televisual emission from Amazon Prime. Now that all eight episodes of the first series (or ‘season’, as we … Continue reading Continue reading

Posted in amazon prime, durin, elrond, galadriel, gandalf, gil-galad, halbrand, john garth, Monty Python's Life of Brian, sauroin, Science-fiction, the lord of the rings, the rings of power, the science of middle earth, tolkien | Comments Off on The Rings of Power: Impressions of the First Series

What I Read In September

Edward Gibbon: The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, volume 4 (Folio Society Edition). We arrive at last at the Fifth Century and the agonising collapse of the Western Roman Empire. Assailed by barbarians on all sides (The century … Continue reading Continue reading

Posted in accordion crimes, Annie Proulx, Barkskins, Belisarius, Brokeback Mountain, David hereby, edward gibbon, interstellar, J R R Tolkien, Justinian, Lost Realms, mark twain, Max Adams, Procopius, sleepers of Ephesus, the decline and fall of the roman empire, The First Kingdom, the Shipping News, the time machine, Theodora, Thomas Williams, Us and Them, woody Allen, Writing & Reading | Comments Off on What I Read In September

Shortlisted

I am ecstatic to announce that my latest tome, A (Very) Short History of Life on Earth, has been shortlisted for the 2022 Royal Society Insight Investment Science Book Prize. A popular-science equivalent of the Booker Prize, the Royal Society … Continue reading Continue reading

Posted in age proof, anjana ahuja, Apparitions, different, frans de waal, hot air, Isaac Asimov, Jeremy farrar, nick davidson, Peter Stott, rose Anne Kenny, Royal Society, royal society insight investment science book prize, Science Is Vital, spike, the early Asimov, the greywacke, Writing & Reading | Comments Off on Shortlisted

Queuowulf

As I expect you both have, I’ve been wondering why I have felt so moved at the passing of the Queen, someone I never knew or even met. It is a feeling that many people seem to share, so much … Continue reading Continue reading

Posted in Apparitions, Beowulf, J R R Tolkien, Jorgmungandr, Maria Dahvana Headley, Politicrox, Queen Elizabeth II, queues, Seamus Heaney, Writing & Reading | Comments Off on Queuowulf

What It Must Have Been Like To Be The Queen

Many years ago when the world was young I was one of the four Vice Presidents of the Linnean Society of London. Each year the society would have a ‘conversazione’ — basically a drinks party — in some nice location, … Continue reading Continue reading

Posted in Domesticrox, Linnean Society of London, Queen Elizabeth, The Queen | Comments Off on What It Must Have Been Like To Be The Queen

Of the Rings of Power

By now you’ll both have gathered that I have a passing interest in the works of J. R. R. Tolkien, so I hope you won’t mind that I attempt a review of the first two episodes of The Rings of … Continue reading Continue reading

Posted in bear mccreary, celebrimbor, Cinema, feanor, finrod, galadriel, gericault, gil-galad, goblins, harry potter, howard shore, j k rowling, lenny henry, leonard cohen, middle earth, morgoth, numenoreans, orcs, outlander, peter jackson, Sauron, Science-fiction, the hobbit, the lord of the rings, the raft of the medusa, the rings of power, the silimarillion, tolkien, valinor, Writing & Reading, xena warrior princess | Comments Off on Of the Rings of Power

The Cromer Chainsaw Massacre

Cast your mind back more than a decade, to 2011, when the Gees were thinking of doing some serious remodelling to the Maison des Girrafes. Around that time, a local DIY store was having a closing-down sale, so we went … Continue reading Continue reading

Posted in Buddleia, chainsaw, Domesticrox, Gardening, triffid | Comments Off on The Cromer Chainsaw Massacre

What I Read In August

Edward Gibbon: The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire (vol 2) (Folio Society Edition) I bought a handsome 8-volume set of Gibbon’s classic history cheaply on eBay. Attentive readers will note that I reviewed volume 1 last month, so … Continue reading Continue reading

Posted in 64 charing cross road, alastair reynolds, annie barrows, arian heresy, athanasian creed, battle of hadrianople, century rain, council of nicaea, dan simmons, darrell bricker, dracula, drood, edward gibbon, empty planet, flashback, john ibbitson, les liaisons dangereuses, lovedeath, mary ann shaffer, miriam margolyes, paul ehrlich, paul morland, rebecca, the decline and fall of the roman empire, the guernsey literary and potato peel pie society, the population bomb, the terror, this much is true, tomorrows people, Writing & Reading | Comments Off on What I Read In August