Flying through the Crick

Quick update to my post about the Crick Institute building site.

The Crick has now released a fly-through video animation to show what the interior of the building will look like. It is just 4 minutes long, and includes some views from the exterior too.

About Frank Norman

I am a librarian in a biomedical research institute. I've been around a few years, long enough to know that exciting new things fall into the same familiar patterns. I'm interested in navigating a path for libraries as we move further from print to electronic resources to open research, and become more embedded in research workflows.
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4 Responses to Flying through the Crick

  1. rpg says:

    Coool… even better that it’s apparently going to be staffed by holographic ghosts. Or do ordinary people just become dull, grey and slightly translucent when they step through the doors?

  2. It’s lovely, Frank. Thanks for the link. It reminds me of a cross between the Mission Bay campus of UCSF and the Pasteur Building at Imperial. The outside is really stunning…and I can see how working in someplace so open and spacious would make a big difference. Lots of places for socializing too, which is good for science.

  3. James Lush says:

    It looks, to borrow an expression from my youth, totally mint! And very conducive to collaborative research.

  4. Frank says:

    On the Crick website it mentions that the film was created by:

    … lifting the designs, created by architects HOK working with PLP Architecture, from the drawing board and realising them in film. The animation was produced by Glowfrog and PLP Architecture.

    RIchard – I think that as we get closer and closer to the opening in 2015, and know exactly who will be in which lab, so the figures in the film will begin to resemble real people more and more. A bit like The Picture of Dorian Gray.

    Jenny – Yes, I think the collaboration spaces in the centre of each floor are the thing that could make it different. Also the openness – there should be a sense of the wholeness of the Institute wherever you are in the building.