Monthly Archives: February 2024

Opportunities

It’s a horrible word, redundant. ‘No longer needed or useful; superfluous’. I don’t feel superfluous, but have to admit to feeling a little less than useful. Some people have been very kind, noting my efforts to continue to support my … Continue reading Continue reading

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What I Read In February

Barbra Streisand: My Name Is Barbra I first came across Barbra Streisand with a fluffy comic song in my parents’ record collection. It was ‘Second-Hand Rose’, which I now know was written in 1921 and originally performed by the music-hall … Continue reading Continue reading

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Notes from Open Research London, 12 February 2024

Earlier this month Open Research London held a half day event at the Francis Crick Institute to mark Love Your Data week, comprising six half-hour talks. The very engaging and interesting talks were focused on research data discovery, with detours … Continue reading Continue reading

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Games Without Frontiers

My enthusiasm for sport has always surpassed my ability. Except for soccer. At school, me and John Grant would always play in defence and hope the ball never came our way. I still don’t see the point of that one. … Continue reading Continue reading

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What (and How) Should We Teach our Children?

In the world of social media and ChatGPT, a post-Covid world and a world where climate change and war put everything and everyone under new strains and worse, what should our students – at school or university – be taught … Continue reading Continue reading

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Family Tree

We’re blessed to have a larger-than-usual garden (for these parts). Legend has it that when they built this development at the arse-end of the 1980s, what-was-to-become our plot was down for 2 (or even 3) houses, but they didn’t get … Continue reading Continue reading

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No News Is Good News

During a group discussion at work (as you both know, by day I’m with the Submerged Log Company) a colleague noted that among the various things one wouldn’t be allowed do with human subjects, one would be to deprive them … Continue reading Continue reading

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In which we fast-forward

The phrase bleak midwinter was first coined by the English poet Christina Rossetti in 1872 and went viral when composer Gustav Holst incorporated her text into a carol a few decades later. Although the words are clearly meant to evoke … Continue reading Continue reading

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2023 – Top Ten, plus one

In a surprising twist, here are my top 10 photographs from 2023… only a couple of months into 2024! As usual, they also live in a Flickr set that you can explore here. Craig McRae, Royal Agricultural Winter Fair (November) … Continue reading Continue reading

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Hunstanton Sand

I’ve just started reading a book called The Spirit of Enquiry by Susannah Gibson, celebrating the 200th anniversary of the Cambridge Philosophical Society, an interesting society of which I was once a committee member (as well as a prize-winner). I … Continue reading Continue reading

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Heart of Glass

Had I not been out the front of the house, watching Joshua earning some pocket money by washing the car,  I’d probably have sent the milk round sales droid on his way. But I was, and we talked, and seduced … Continue reading Continue reading

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What do you do when God comes for your LinkedIn?

My Father’s house has many rooms 2 My Father’s house has many rooms; if that were not so, would I have told you that I am going there to prepare a place for you? 3 And if I go and … Continue reading Continue reading

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A Place Called England

I planted snowdrops in the green in the woods last Sunday morning, and this Saturday when we visited they were already demurely in bloom. We usually get one crazy forerunner between Christmas and New Year in our garden, but it’s … Continue reading Continue reading

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Transferable Skills and Career Paths

I am honoured to have been invited to give the Gareth Roberts Lecture in Durham next month (in the Physics Department), following a long line of distinguished speakers. To be honest, I did not know that he had been associated … Continue reading Continue reading

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