It’s a Mystery

Browsing through the latest and greatest at NN, I noticed this new event posted by Matt

Clarke’s Cabinets of Cures: Blood, Mermaids and Madness

Am I the only one who thinks it sounds like Maxine’s critique of Henry’s LabLit novel?

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Scientist, poet, gadfly
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18 Responses to It’s a Mystery

  1. Henry Gee says:

    I don’t be,ieve Maxine has read my novel. So you’re on your own…

  2. Maxine Clarke says:

    I have to admit I was a bit worried when it popped up in my ‘snapshot’ (as a result of being a ‘friend’ or ‘contact’ of M@, I pretend to have no special knowledge of mermaids, blood or madness).
    As yet, I haven’t pronounced on this novel, I am still working my way through the 300 or so on my shelves. I am on holiday today (day 3 of 3, back in office tomorrow), and have spent a blissful and unprecedented two hours this afternoon reading solidly. The book, however, is a Scandinavian gloom (my favourite genre) by Asa Larsson. The title is The Black Path. Yes, when you pick up a Scandinavian (in this case, Swedish) book with a title like The Black Path you know you are in for a real treat (if you are anything like me, which is I have to admit, extremely unlikely).
    Back to work tomorrow so I hope I get the chance to finish it.

  3. Maxine Clarke says:

    Note, my comment “crossed” with Prof Sir H Gee’s.

  4. Maxine Clarke says:

    BTW I was able to read today because one daughter was writing an essay on Curly’s character in Of Mice and Men, and the other was penning a tome on Stalin’s collectivization and whether it was a political and/or economic success. I guess I did not draw the short straw on this occasion. (Malcolm was at work listening to John Bell on translational research among other things.)

  5. Richard P. Grant says:

    You quite happy talking to yourself, Sheila?

  6. Henry Gee says:

    Prof Sir H. Gee? No, you’re confusing me with Prof Lord Sir Robert Winston. Easily done, I know.

  7. Matt Brown says:

    You know what, I might just head over to the Wellcome and write up something about Clarke’s Cabinet of Cures. Sounds intriguing.

  8. Henry Gee says:

    I pretend to have no special knowledge of mermaids, blood or madness
    You’d know a lot more were you to read my book

  9. Bob O'Hara says:

    Henry, it sounds like it might not be dark enough for Maxine. You’ll have to re-write it to add a couple of attempted suicides, and give Fitch a secret addiction to sniffing glue.
    Matt – you might have to arrange a works outing.

  10. Henry Gee says:

    Henry, it sounds like it might not be dark enough for Maxine.
    There’s plenty of filthy weather, though. Not to mention gloom. And lots of blood. I suppose I could take out some of the jokes, though.
    Matt – you might have to arrange a works outing.
    Already in hand. Come to Cromer and see the locations that inspired By The Sea.

  11. Frank Norman says:

    Oh. Is By the Sea required reading for all delegates at the Bracing Cromer meeting?

  12. Bob O'Hara says:

    It would help you understand some of the strange behaviour of the locals.

  13. Henry Gee says:

    Is By the Sea required reading for all delegates at the Bracing Cromer meeting?
    No, but I can’t resist any opportunity for self promotion.

  14. Kristi Vogel says:

    You know what, I might just head over to the Wellcome and write up something about Clarke’s Cabinet of Cures
    Please do, Matt. The exhibit will be gone by the time I make it to the UK (for the Bracing Cromer meeting, for which I am prepared at least re: By the Sea).

  15. Brian Clegg says:

    Sorry, being of a certain age, with the title of this post I couldn’t resist this:

  16. Henry Gee says:

    Maxine sings better than that. I’m sure of it.

  17. Bob O'Hara says:

    Thanks for that reminder, Brian. I’m going to have words with my sub-conscious now.

  18. Brian Clegg says:

    Oh come on. Henry’s not a Toyah fan? There can’t be many pop singers whose lyrics have included words like Necronomicon. And yes, there’s a video for that too:
    … if you can’t stand the excitement of waiting for it (or even worse, the 80s dancing), you will find it occuring first around 3 minutes and 3 seconds.